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Issue No 110    January 22, 2008

 

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FEATURE STORIES:

8. OMB Approves Demolition of Alma College
9. Who Defends the View of The Ontario Legislature?
16. HVRA: Who Ya Gonna Call to Restore?
40. Google: Obituary of Howard Colvin

IN THIS ISSUE:

EVENTS    submit an event

1. U of T, Architecture Landscape and Design
2. Toronto Preservation Board Meeting
3. Heritage York Annual Dinner & Dance
4. Black Creek Pioneer Village
5. Ontario Heritage Conference
6. University of Victorias Cultural Resource Management Program
7. Conserving Historic Structures

NEWS | ACTION    submit a news or action item

8. OMB Approves Demolition of Alma College
9. Who Defends the View of The Ontario Legislature?
10. Descendent of builder of Moore House in Sparta on the Moore House Compromise

LINKS    submit a link

11. Globe and Mail: Richard Florida on University of Toronto
12. nowtoronto.com: Rio Can Development Queen West
13. nowtoronto.com: Insight - Union Station's big save
14. Now Magazine: City unveils Plan for Toronto Film Studio Lands
15. Toronto Star: Earthhour lead up
16. HVRA: Who Ya Gonna Call to Restore?
17. Globe and Mail: Lewis Lukes House - New Owners
18. St. Thomas Times-Journal: A vision of courthouse - Architects share look into future
19. London Free Press: Locust Mount Reprieve
20. Hamilton Spectator: Duncan: $7m is for heritage preservation, period
21. Hamilton Spectator: Time to resolve the Lister saga
22. Hamilton Spectator: Board belongs in core
23. Kitchener Record: Will or won't Kitchener Council adopt Heritage Bylaw
24. Kitchener-Waterloo Record: Another Heritage Demolition in K/W
25. Kitchener - Waterloo Record: Kitchener has shown a brutal disregard for its heritage
26. The Record: Grand House, Student Project in Cambridge
27. Guelph Mercury, Guelph's Pro-Heritage Council a Year Into their term
28. Niagarathisweek.com: Extreme Makeover: Church Edition
29. blogto.com/: Canada Malting Co. Stay of Execution
30. Cambridge Times: City approves seniors apartment project
31. BD.online: Reverse illegal demolition
32. Financial Times: Protect and preserve
33. Ottawa Sun: The little building that could: 145-year-old Kars hall will roll into Upper Canada Village next week for a fresh start
34. Victoria Times Colonist: City weighs in on reno at Rogers' - Plan to expand chocolate shop's interior sets off alarm bells with heritage buffs
35. Daily Commercial News and Construction Record: Royal Architectural Institute of Canada responds to plan for roof over Vancouver
36. Ministry of Culture Package "Supporting Heritage in your Community"
37. Moose Jaw Times Herald: Historical importance of Anavets building investigated
38. Halifax Chronicle-Herald: Heritage, height and heating
39. Daily Commercial News: Montreal's Windsor Station for sale?
40. Google: Obituary of Howard Colvin
41. News from Saint John: An excellent Blog with all the latest

SUPPORT

42. Support Built Heritage News

 

CONTACT

43. Contact the Editor

 

EVENTS : Issue No 110 January 22, 2008
 

1. U of T, Architecture Landscape and Design
Bulthaup Spring Lecture Series

Place: Room 103, 230 College Street
Date: January 22, 2008  -  February 5, 2008
Time: 6:30  -  6:30
Info: 416 978 5038    http://www.ald.utoronto.ca

1/22/08 Jurgen Mayer H., J. Mayer H. Architect, Berlin, Re: Activators
2/5/08   Barry Sampson, Baird Sampson Neuert Architects, New Terrain

 

2. Toronto Preservation Board Meeting

Place: Committee Room 1, Toronto City Hall
Date: January 24, 2008
Time: 2:00 p.m.
Info: http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/2008/agendas/pb.htm

The newly appointed Toronto Preservation Board will be meeting for the first time. Congratulations to Edith Geduld who is acting as interim chair.

Four former members are returning, 6 new members. Members are  
Mary Louise Ashbourne, Adriana Balen, Alan Dudeck, Patrice A. Dutil, Edith Geduld, Paul Gogan, Yew-Thong Leong, Prishram Jain, Jennifer Rieger, Councillor Kyle Rae, Robert Saunders, Councillor Michael Thompson, Councillor Adam Vaughan, Representative of Toronto and East York Community Preservation Panel

Agenda includes adoption of the Federal Standards and Guidelines in Toronto, demolition of a coach house in Rosedale, Designation of the Automotive Building at the CNE,

The Toronto Preservation Board Agenda is now available on the City's Website at the following address:



Lambton House


3. Heritage York Annual Dinner & Dance
Guest Speaker: Karolyn Smardz Frost

Place: Historic Lambton House 4066 Old Dundas Street (by the Humber) Former City of York
Date: Saturday, February 2nd 2008
Time: 6:30 PM for 7:15 PM
Place: $35.00 per person
Info: This is Heritage York's 14th Annual Fundraising Dinner & Dance for the restoration of the historic Lambton House. Guest Speaker: critically acclaimed author KAROLYN SMARDZ FROST Buffet: Lambton House Roast Beef with Heritage Vegetables etc. 7:15 PM Silent Auction: 6:30 - 9:00ish Speaker: 8:15ish 9:15ish We Boogie! For more information or tickets call Lambton House (416)-767-5472 or (416)-767-7633 http//www.lambtonhouse.org    http://www.lambtonhouse.org
 

4. Black Creek Pioneer Village
"Herstory" Four fascinating Speakers, Four Great Topics Exploring Women in the 19th Century, One Historic Venue...

Place: Black Creek Pioneer Village 1000 Murray Ross Parkway Toronto, Ontario
Date: February 4, 12, 19, 26
Time: 7 for 7:30
Place: $10/evening $30/all four evenings
Info: For tickets or more information please call: 416-667-6295 or visit blackcreek.ca Call to reserve your spot now!    http://www.blackcreek.ca

Karolyn Smardz Frost
Lucie's Story, from I've got a Home in Glory Land: A Lost Tale of the Underground Railroad

12th - Bettina Bradbury
Nineteenth Century Widowhood: Challenges, Choices and Constraints

19th - Cecilia Morgan
Candy, Cows, and Commemoration: the Case of Laura Secord

26th - Myra Rutherdale
When Shall the Doors be Open: Women's Desire for Higher Education in Nineteenth Century Canada

 

5. Ontario Heritage Conference
"Landmarks not Landfill: Heritage Preservation and Environmental Sustainability"

Place: Collingwood Ontario
Date: May 30th to June 1
Info: http://www.heritageconference.ca

The 2008 Heritage Conservation Conference titlehas been announced.
It is co-hosted by the ACO, Community Heritage Ontario, and Collingwood and
will take place May 30 to June 1.

Sponsored by Community Heritage Ontario, the Architectural Conservancy of
Ontario, and the Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals

Conference Topics

Environmental Responsibility... Sustainable Development. Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. These are key phrases heard daily in our media reports and social conversations. It is only fitting that the 2008 Heritage Conservation
Conference will focus on the theme of heritage preservation and
environmental sustainability.

The Ministry of Culture will launch the first day of the conference with
presentations and workshops in the morning. We are pleased to announce the
Ontario Heritage Trust will continue to explore the role of heritage and the
environment as well as discussion on the Trust's role in protecting our
natural heritage.

On the second day of the conference, sessions will focus on such hot-button
topics as "Re-Development Within Heritage Districts," "Adaptive Re-use of
Historic Buildings," "Environmental Effects on Historic Structures," and
"Heritage Preservation and Sustainable Development."

Speakers:

Donovan Rypkema, John Sewell, and many more

Collingwood invites conference participants to join us in our celebration of
our town's 150th sesquicentennial anniversary. During your stay you will
have the chance to explore our beautiful downtown heritage conservation
district, learn about our shipbuilding history, and discover our abundant
natural heritage.

 

6. University of Victorias Cultural Resource Management Program
HA 489E

Place: Monte Alban, Mexico (Oaxaca)
Date: March 2-8
Place: Tuition and materials $620CDN; A program fee of CDN$280 will also be required to cover local arrangement costs. Non-credit and credit options. Note: These fees do not include travel to and from Oaxaca, local accommodation, or meals.
Info: Anissa Paulsen Tel: 250 721 6119 E:mail: apaulsen@uvcs.uvic.ca    http://www.uvcs.uvic.ca/crmp/courses/ha489e-approaches.aspx

Join the  for the following 6-day learning opportunity on location in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Approaches to Historic Site Stewardship: Perspectives from Monte Alban
HA 489E- on location in Oaxaca, Mexico

Join us at Monte Alban, the spectacular World Heritage Site in Oaxaca, Mexico, to explore multifaceted and contemporary approaches to sustainable heritage stewardship in historic and archaeological sites. Monte Alban is recognized by UNESCO as one of fourteen sites worldwide that serve as models for site management planning. It offers an exceptional laboratory for assessing strategies that emphasize effective planning, services, and fidelity to authenticity within the site while responding to demands and uncertainties from an array of external interests.

This innovative and intensive course combines workshops, site visits in and around Monte Alban and Oaxaca, and learning activities that strengthen your ability to:

* analyze the values and the social, economic and environmental dynamics that create a context for site stewardship
* assess both the opportunities and challenges that sites face in serving their communities
* consider the logistical requirements involved with site stewardship, public programs, and visitor services
* develop site management plans that stress sustainability and community engagement
* implement management and staff development systems that are appropriate to your site, community and resources

More information on Monte Alban can be found at http://www.sacredsites.com/americas/mexico/monte_alban.html.

Instructors: Dr. Nelly Robles Garcia and Dr. Jack Corbett

Across Mexico the terms “cultural resource management” and “heritage planning” are virtually synonymous with the name Nelly Robles Garcia. Over the past two decades her pioneering work and steadfast commitment to archaeological resources protection has moved the professional community and public policy from a static focus on technical skills and legal structures to an increasing emphasis on dynamic management, strategic planning, and a sophisticated understanding of the relationship between archaeological zones and the communities of stakeholders which surround them.

Currently director of the archaeological zone at Monte Alban, part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site consisting of that monumental site with the historic center of the nearby city of Oaxaca, Nelly has spent almost her entire career in her native state. She holds an undergraduate degree in archaeology from the National School of Archaeology and History, a masters in restoration from the National School of Restoration, Conservation, and Museum Studies, both in Mexico City, and a doctorate in anthropology from the University of Georgia, where she studied on fellowships from the U.S.-Mexico Fulbright Commission and the American Association of University Women. Following an earlier period as director of the archaeological zone at Mitla in 1997 the National Institute of Anthropology and History named her to the post she holds today.

Dr. Jack Corbett, of Portland State University (USA) and the Instituto Tecnologico de Oaxaca (Mexico), has written extensively on community-based cultural and natural resources management under conditions of competition and conflict.

LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS

This course also provides an opportunity to experience the wonderful architecture and culture of Oaxaca and to enjoy its lovely sunny climate in the company of heritage professionals from across North America and beyond. Participants will be provided with information on accommodation options that range from modest ($70 per day) to mid-range ($85-100CND per night), and congenial meals and evening gatherings will be coordinated.

TRAVEL

Participants are expected to make their own travel arrangement to and from Oaxaca, arriving no later than the morning of Sunday, March 2 and departing no earlier than 2 pm on Saturday, March 8. Normal routing for travel to Oaxaca is through Mexico City. Mexicana Airlines offers regular local flights to Oaxaca (approximately 1 hour in duration), and bus transportation can be arranged (approximately 6 hours in transit). Participants are responsible for arranging for personal travel and health insurance.

For more information on this and other upcoming courses please visit our website http://www.uvcs.uvic.ca/crmp/home.aspx or contact:

 

7. Conserving Historic Structures
HA489J

Place: Univeristy of Victoria, Victoria B.C.
Date: April 14-19, 2008
Info: http://www.uvcs.uvic.ca/crmp/courses/ha489j.aspx

Join the Cultural Resource Management Program at the University of Victoria for the following 6-day learning opportunity in Victoria. While historic structures range from modest to monumental, and encompass a remarkable variety of materials and uses, approaches to their conservation are governed by core principles and determined by well-developed standards of practice. This intensive course enhances your understanding of the complex characteristics of heritage structures, systems, and materials, and provides frameworks for planning and managing appropriate conservation processes. Develop your ability to:

- identify the building materials and systems commonly encountered in heritage structures analyze the nature and extent of deterioration in building materials and systems' and identify its causes - analyze the environmental factors which contribute to deterioration - investigate and document the physical condition and history of a structure and its materials - select conservation strategies for a range of materials, based on the condition and intended use of the structure plan and manage the conservation process Harold D. Kalman, Ph.D., is Principal of the office of Commonwealth Historic Resource Management Limited. He is a specialist in the planning and history of heritage and cultural resources. Raised in Montreal, he received his education at Princeton University and had additional training in conservation at Cornell UniversityYork University England. He taught at the University British Columbia for seven years before entering private practice in 1975. He is Founding President of the British Columbia Association of Heritage Professionals and has served on the boards of the Association for Preservation Technology and the Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals. In 2006, he was awarded the British Columbia Heritage award. Dr. Kalman is Honorary Professor of Architecture at Hong Kong University and continues to lecture and teach worldwide on conservation and cultural heritage issues. Fee: CDN$620*, including a CDN$60 materials fee (Canadian funds, credit and non-credit participation options) A CDN$160 registration deposit is required at time of registration. Please note fees are subject to change. The Cultural Resource Management Program is an Architectural Institute of British Columbia registered provider offering an AIBCaccredited activity for continuing education learning units. This course is assigned 36 AIBC core learning credits. It is also accepted for learning credits with the Planning Institute of British Columbia. Intercultural Education and Training Program

 

   
NEWS | ACTION : Issue No 110 January 22, 2008



All that will be left of Alma College unless the Minister of Culture Intervenes


8. OMB Approves Demolition of Alma College
Catherine Nasmith, with local reports

The OMB has decided in favour of the City of St. Thomas and the agreement that the city made with the owners of the Alma property, the Zubick family. - which is to allow the demolition of the college, permitting the repeal of the Heritage designation and ordering only the retention of the Entranceway to the College.
The College was allowed to fall apart due to lack of care by the owners and lack of property enforcement by St. Thomas. It has been plaqued as a property of provincial importance since the eighties, but to date the Minister of Culture has not intervened in any way to assist either the municipality to save it, or to stop the demolition order once an agreement with the owners was made. In the previous cases where the Minister has intervened, the Lister Block and the Moore farmhouse, the Minister has waited until after the 11th hour to intervene....That hour is surely here now. It is on both Heritage Canada and the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario's most endangered lists. The Architectural Conservancy has written twice to the Minister of Culture to intervene to save this building. An intervention by the Minister would send a clear message to the owners, the municipality, and to the rest of the province that demolition by neglect is not an option to get rid of a building in Ontario. Failure to act will send the opposite message. Time to get those cards and letters going to MPP's, this is not a building that Ontario can afford to lose.



The Legislature viewed from the South


9. Who Defends the View of The Ontario Legislature?
Catherine Nasmith

Sometimes we stumble into things by accident. Sometimes a perfect storm develops when no-one is watching.

Just before Christmas, at the Centre for Landscape Research at the University of Toronto, Councillor Adam Vaughan, Professor John Danahy and urban designer Robert Allsopp all experienced one of those “Oh My God” moments. The lab is a three-dimensional computer modeling facility, where it is possible to simulate the experience of walking around through the city and seeing what we see from street level.

They had convened there to introduce Councillor Vaughan to the facility and to show him how it could be used to assist communities to understand the impacts of planning applications in their area. The Centre has a well-developed model of the University of Toronto Campus, and the neighbouring Legislature. Looking at a hastily and roughly constructed model of several proposed developments for the area along Bloor Street West and Avenue Road, they realized that the concentration of applications for high rise development in this precinct, some as high as 70 stories would change not only the experience of Bloor Street north of the University forever, but could also mar the view of both University College from Kings College Circle and, even more important, the view of the Legislature from University Avenue. At night in particular, the view of the floodlit Legislature is a real beacon - the profile of the building is seen against the dark sky. Buildings behind would detract from this view and diminish this important symbol of our democracy.

William Greer, a former staff member of the Toronto Historical Board noted that when an earlier development had been proposed the Board had expressed concern about signage and lights behind the Parliament buildings.

But who protects this view? In the sixties and seventies it had been the responsibility of a committee of architects that reported to the Planning Board, but both bodies have been gone for a long time. Is there any of this past work still in force in the amalgamated City? The Speaker controls the legislative precinct, but has no control over planning matters in the areas north and south of it. There was  a University Avenue Bylaw at the former City of Toronto, but is it strong enough to deal adequately with this view? Is it still in force? Is the City of Toronto paying attention to this view as they assess the development applications? A perfect storm? Could be.

In a subsequent conversation Councillor Vaughan advised that City of Toronto planners are modeling this view, and are concerned about the impacts of different projects on it. If the City did refuse an application because it would impact on the view of Queen’s Park, would the OMB agree? Should the Minister of Culture be involved? Should the Premier talk to the Mayor?

Ottawa has been blessed with the National Capital Commission, who pay close attention to such matters. In the late eighties, early nineties, they commissioned a very elaborate heights study utilizing the Centre for Landscape Research and du Toit Allsopp Hillier to establish height controls for the City of Ottawa to protect the views of the “National Symbols”. While the NCC did not have the legal means to protect the views, public pressure was such that the NCC was able to work with the City and the development community to set very stringent height controls that have stood up for over fifteen years, and are still holding.

With all the development pressures north and south of the precinct it seems time to establish a Provincial Capital Commission, to work with the City of Toronto to protect the dignity of the Ontario’s Parliament buildings.



Moore Farmhouse 1824


10. Descendent of builder of Moore House in Sparta on the Moore House Compromise
Donna Moore

Letter to the editor

P.J.S. Symes wrote recently about Locust Mount and compares the situation to Moore house in Sparta. He notes that the preservation of Moore house should be ensured because of the associated history of the early settlers and historical events. I wish he were right. Moore house will not receive a historical designation even though several informed professionals have recommended this action. The owners will be allowed to make a garage out of the main level leading to the removal of much of one wall. The second story frame addition will be removed. During the 1837 Rebellion, rebels were able to escape into the nearby woods by using the back door from this second floor. Another wall will be altered to connect a walkway to a new house being attached to the ‘Moore Garage’. The new Minister of Culture, Aileen Carroll, could have designated this building and thus made a strong statement supporting heritage preservation, but she didn’t. In her letter about the issue, she wrote “Moore house will not be demolished but will be incorporated into a new home to meet the needs of the owners.” If the Minister of Culture is bending to the owner’s needs and not championing the need to preserve our built heritage, who will?

Donna Moore, London

Editor's Note: This letter was drafted for the London Free Press, and shared with BHN. This is the same Donna Moore who dressed up as her ancestor and travelled to Sarnia to the campaign office of Caroline di Cocco.

   
LINKS : Issue No 110 January 22, 2008
 

11. Globe and Mail: Richard Florida on University of Toronto
Peter Scowen

RICHARD FLORIDA VISITS THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

No ivory tower on this campus

Architecturally and ideologically, the city's most prestigious academic institution blends seamlessly into the city centre

This is the third in a series of articles in which The Globe and Mail visits an iconic Toronto neighbourhood with Richard Florida. Dr. Florida is a professor at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management and academic director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the Rotman School. He is the founder of the Creative Class Group (creativeclass.com) in Washington, D.C., which develops strategies for business, government and community competitiveness, and author of the bestselling books The Rise of the Creative Class and The Flight of the Creative Class. His next book, Who's Your City?, is scheduled for publication in March. He also writes a monthly column in the Focus section; the next one will be published on Jan. 26.

click here for the URL




12. nowtoronto.com: Rio Can Development Queen West
Dylan Reid

Can area

 

It's a refreshing experience to sit in a community meeting at which the developer is not trying to grab additional height. Especially since, for half a year now, disquieting rumours have been circulating about a big-box home improvement emporium (Home Depot) slated to go up in a parking lot at Queen and Portland. Surprise. RioCan has presented plans for a mixed-use commercial and residential building on the corner that actually conforms to the zoning restrictions laid out by the city: three storeys along Queen and seven along Richmond. Zoning rules aren't the only thing keeping the developer from building a quick-and-dirty glass box that';s completely out of character with the small, independent shops that give the street its appeal. RioCan's proposal is also the first to be subject to the new Heritage District designation that council approved last summer for the Queen West strip; a consolation prize for allowing the abominably out-of-proportion Federal Court building at Queen and Simcoe.

 

click here for the URL

 

13. nowtoronto.com: Insight - Union Station's big save

Toronto"s greatest historical landmark is to be remade. The idea's been tried before, with uninspiring results. Will David Miller's vision restore Canada's grandest example of beaux arts architecture to its former grandeur? We parse the city's plan and offer a five-point proposal of our own. All aboard.

 

click here for the URL




14. Now Magazine: City unveils Plan for Toronto Film Studio Lands
Mike Smith

Eastern promises

Citys revamp for Leslieville shows numbing influence of OMB Its a good thing an Ontario Municipal Board hearing spurred a neighbourhood planning study for Leslieville. Its just too bad that now the citys gone and done a neighbourhood planning study for Leslieville that was clearly spurred by an OMB hearing. The South of Eastern Secondary Plan for the Toronto Film Studio lands and area was presented to community council on Tuesday, January 15. These lands constitute downtowns last intact employment district, a highfalutin term for areas designated for industry. (Film studios are all that remain these days.) The plan delineates everything it should, with an obvious bias toward keeping out retail, especially of the gargantuan and corporate variety.

click here for the URL

 

15. Toronto Star: Earthhour lead up

Six fantastic pieces by great Canadian artists on the environment. No amount of scientific data could touch the heart the way these writers do. Jane Urquart piece deals with the disappearing environment, built and natural near her family home.

Ms. Urquart was the key note speaker at last years Architectural Conservancy of Ontario dinner in Guelph.....for me the most memorable phrase was " Beauty is a fundamental human right".....

click here for the URL



Directory Cover


16. HVRA: Who Ya Gonna Call to Restore?
Richard Longley

Directory for Conservators and Restorers of Heritage Property

Harbord Village Heritage Conservation District Directory for Conservators and Restorers of Heritage Properties is now posted on the website of Harbord Village Residents' Association. 

To access the Directory (which provides guidance and links to experts, crafts people and suppliers for those who plan to conserve and restore rather than ‘renovate’ their heritage homes) click on 'Heritage Conservation' in the HVRA website’s contents column to the left of the homepage. Then scroll down to the bottom line and click on 'here' to obtain a PDF file of the latest (fifth, 52pp) edition of the Directory. Constructive criticisms, additional information and names of additional experts (with details of their expertise) will be warmly received by ACO member at large, Richard Longley <longley_fovea@sympatico.ca>. He will be updating the Directory on an ongoing basis.

email: longley_fovea@sympatico.ca

click here for the URL

Editor's Note: HVRA have done us all a fantastic service. If you have any tips of skilled craftspersons or great suppliers or sources for restoring in Ontario please forward to Richard.



E.J. Lennox' Annex Style masterpiece


17. Globe and Mail: Lewis Lukes House - New Owners
Dave LeBlanc

The home office

You'd think it wouldn't be a big deal to perform an act as small as opening a window. Or that singing schoolchildren and their teachers strolling underneath the tree canopy outside could increase productivity. That there's a nice coffee and sandwich shop down the way shouldn't be revolutionary.

Yet, these are some of the reasons employees of Maverick Public Relations Inc. look forward to going to work. The reason is that each workday morning, they head to the Annex, one of Toronto's prime residential neighbourhoods, where Maverick has offices at 37 Madison Ave., once the home of Lewis Lukes, contractor.

It wasn't always so. Five years ago, Maverick (and life) partners Julie Rusciolelli and Gerry Riddell were paying $18,000 a month for office space in a tower at Bloor and Church streets.

Despite the "marble up the yin-yang" and other amenities the A-class building offered, Ms. Rusciolelli says, when it came time to renew their lease, the two decided it was time for change. More specifically, it was time to purchase a space more befitting of their corporate image as non-conformists, and nothing other than a Victorian home in the Annex would do.

click here for the URL

 

18. St. Thomas Times-Journal: A vision of courthouse - Architects share look into future
Kyle Rea

 

The same architectural firm that renovated St. Thomas city hall in the 1990s, keeping the old visage but modernizing the interior, has its sights set on the Elgin county courthouse. And partners with the firm say using the current Wellington Street site not only allows St. Thomas to keep one of its oldest buildings, but is more cost-effective than building a new structure. On Wednesday, Dennis Vass and Paul Sapounzi, partners in The Ventin Group architects, held an information session at city hall that mainly attracted members of the legal community. The pair presented preliminary drawings which show that a building of 12,000-plus square metres (130,000 square feet), a size mandated by the province for a new consolidated facility, could be accommodated at the current site. Other requirements such as accessibility for the disabled, new courtrooms and prisoner holding areas, among others, would also be met.

 

click here for the URL




19. London Free Press: Locust Mount Reprieve

Saving front facade of Locust Mount may be only hope

 

The demolition of Locus Mount will be put on hold while city staff and the building's owner explore if the facade can be preserved. Members of the city's planning committee voted last night in favour of the option that would preserve at least a portion of the heritage property at 661 Talbot St. The owner of Locust Mount, Drewlo Holdings, applied for a permit to demolish the structure after it was damaged by a fire on Nov. 10.

 

click here for the URL

 

20. Hamilton Spectator: Duncan: $7m is for heritage preservation, period
Carmela Fragomeni

 

Ontario Finance Minister Dwight Duncan -- in Hamilton on the heels of the failed Lister Block deal -- says the $7-million provincial pledge for the historic downtown building is for restoration purposes only. Some city councillors have publicly expressed a desire to keep the money for other downtown initiatives now that it is pulling out of a plan to lease space in the Lister, but Duncan said yesterday the province is committed to preserving Ontario's heritage. "This money was provided for restoration," he told reporters after closed-door provincial prebudget consultations with several Hamilton and area groups.

 

click here for the URL

 

21. Hamilton Spectator: Time to resolve the Lister saga
Robert Howard

 

It would be lovely to save the Lister Block -- to see the once-handsome 1920s building preserved and restored. But barring a five-minutes-to-midnight intervention -- accompanied by a rock-solid business case -- it isn't going to happen. The city's tentative deal with the owner, Labourers' International Union of North America (LIUNA), and its development partner, Hi-Rise, is dead. Now, it's time to fish or cut bait. If a realistic, properly financed proposal for Lister Block restoration can't be sold to the owners within the next two months, the city and the province should step back and not interfere with any demolition plans. Hamilton council was right to pull the plug on the Lister leasing deal -- essentially an enormous public subsidy -- that would have seen taxpayers on the hook for costs of more than $37 a square foot. That would have been an irresponsible and reckless $44.2-million commitment.

 

click here for the URL

 

22. Hamilton Spectator: Board belongs in core
Paul Wilson

The fountains in City Hall's forecourt are gone. Will it be long before the modernist board of education building follows?

David Braley, a millionaire many times over, still picks up his own phone. But that doesn't mean he's going to tell you anything. Braley is a generous man. He's donating $50 million to McMaster's medical school, including $10 million in seed money for a big family medicine centre downtown.

 

click here for the URL

 

23. Kitchener Record: Will or won't Kitchener Council adopt Heritage Bylaw
Frank Etherington

Kitchener has shown a brutal disregard for its heritage

Over the years, Kitchener has justifiably become known as a city that cares little about the preservation of its most beautiful heritage buildings.

Which explains why, compared to Cambridge, Guelph and Waterloo, we have a mundane downtown and, with minor exceptions, a very ugly city.

Our municipality's shameful heritage reputation grew from its repeated neglect and lack of care or stewardship for historical properties owned by the city.

Which helps explain why I almost choked on my breakfast Shreddies one recent morning as I read in this newspaper about what sounded like a New Year resolution by city bureaucrats to strengthen our heritage bylaw and increase efforts to maintain what's left of our historic buildings.

click here for the URL

 

24. Kitchener-Waterloo Record: Another Heritage Demolition in K/W
KEVIN SWAYZE

City demolishes abandoned home

Nobody really wanted to see a 140-year-old stone house demolished, but neighbours and city officials agreed there was no other way to protect public safety. "I have very mixed feelings about it," said Marg Davidson, after a power shovel started punching through the front wall of 37 Albert St.

 

click here for the URL

 

25. Kitchener - Waterloo Record: Kitchener has shown a brutal disregard for its heritage
FRANK ETHERINGTON

Over the years, Kitchener has justifiably become known as a city that cares little about the preservation of its most beautiful heritage buildings. Which explains why, compared to Cambridge, Guelph and Waterloo, we have a mundane downtown and, with minor exceptions, a very ugly city. Our municipality's shameful heritage reputation grew from its repeated neglect and lack of care or stewardship for historical properties owned by the city.

 

click here for the URL




26. The Record: Grand House, Student Project in Cambridge

Way cool in Cambridge

In the report card of life, the University of Waterloo students who masterminded a housing project now rising above a Cambridge hillside have earned themselves an A-plus-plus.

From every perspective, what they have accomplished with the 12-bedroom student residence known as Grand House is as incredible as it is ingenious. The community of Waterloo Region should be proud of -- and could learn from -- them all.

Envisioned by a student, designed by students, its construction organized and partly completed by students, and its financing arranged by students, Grand House is already a Galt landmark -- and it isn't even finished. Keep in mind, as you read what follows, that this is not a University of Waterloo project, it is first and last a student endeavour.

click here for the URL

Editor's Note: What a fantastic experience for architecture students!

 

27. Guelph Mercury, Guelph's Pro-Heritage Council a Year Into their term
SAM TURTON

Current city council deserves high marks, but citizens deserve higher

A year ago, Guelph citizens went to the polls and eight incumbents fell. In a new century with world-altering challenges, we voted for progressive, no-nonsense leadership. A year later, how are they doing?

To develop an informed opinion, we need to keep abreast of issues, talk to the mayor and councillors (they don't bite!), and gather information. The city website, guelph.ca, gives a good sense of what's going on in a city with a yearly budget of $300 million, transit vehicles that travel 4 million kilometres a year, and infrastructure assets of $1.55 billion. When writing up a report card it's useful to understand the magnitude of the job.

Go to the website and click on the link for the Mayor's State of the City Address. The presentation is very thorough, with charts, graphics, photos, and commentary. Check out the 2006 Inaugural Address and the links to actions taken this year. Documents on many other issues and items are available.

click here for the URL




28. Niagarathisweek.com: Extreme Makeover: Church Edition
By Mike Zettel

Across the region, businesses have found new uses for former houses of worship

 

The first church in St. Catharines did not have a long history. Subscriptions to St. George's Church, constructed out of wood near the corner of St. Paul Street and Yates, began in 1796. On March 4, 1836, barely 35 years later, the structure, which had been used as a military hospital during the War of 1812, was totally destroyed in a fire. Fortunately for those with an interest in history and heritage buildings, not all churches meet that fate.

 

click here for the URL




29. blogto.com/: Canada Malting Co. Stay of Execution

The Canada Malting Co. silos and plant facilities at the foot of Bathurst Street is the most visible reminder of Toronto's past waterfront industrial heritage. Listed on Toronto's inventory of historic properties since 1973, it is the most intact remnant of the original silo complexes that took advantage of the harbour.

 

click here for the URL

 

30. Cambridge Times: City approves seniors apartment project
1911, the dye house, considered by MHAC to be "an uncompromised example" of an iron framed industrial building is to be demolished.

Ray Martin

The west Galt skyline is about to change as the result of action taken by Cambridge council Monday. Council has approved a plan that will see the construction of a new six-storey, $20 million seniors apartment building on part of the former Tiger Brand industrial complex off Grand Avenue. As part of the project a number of old buildings will be cleared from the two-acre site, which did not sit well with the city's municipal heritage advisory committee (MHAC) as at least one of the buildings had already been identified as being architecturally significant.

 

click here for the URL



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31. BD.online: Reverse illegal demolition
Marguerite Lazell

Developer ordered to rebuild flattened Goldfinger cottage

A property developer who illegally demolished a grade-II listed cottage by Erno Goldfinger has been ordered to rebuild it to the architect’s original design.

Rajiv Laxman, sole director of Croydon-based Abrus, was told by Wandsworth Council to rebuild the caretaker's cottage at the Brandlehow School in Putney to match "exactly" its former appearance using the original materials.

Laxman, who demolished the 1952 building – part of only two schools completed by Goldfinger – in January, could face unlimited crown court fines if he refuses to comply.

“This was a flagrant breach of planning laws and a totally outrageous attempt to flout the regulations that protect the nation’s most valuable and important architectural gems,” council planning chairman Leslie McDonnell said.

“Erno Goldfinger was one of the most interesting post-war designers yet one of the least prolific. That is why the loss of this particular building is felt so acutely.”

English Heritage and the Twentieth Century Society applauded the council’s actions but observers questioned whether the replacement would match the original given that the need for it to meet current building regulations.

“Purely for sending a message, it should be rebuilt like-for-like, independent of building regulations,” Mark Cannata, the project architect at John McAslan & Partners who refurbished Goldfinger’s Trellick Tower said.

click here for the URL

Editor's Note: Sure would be nice to see such an order issued here, it would only take once to get the message out.

 

32. Financial Times: Protect and preserve
Rebecca Knight

Every two years the World Monuments Fund, the New York City-based conservation group, announces a list of the 100 "most endangered" architectural and cultural sites around the world. Chosen by an international panel of experts in archaeology, art history and preservation and based on hundreds of nominations, previous lists have included famous landmarks such as the Taj Mahal, the Great Wall of China and Pompeii as well as more obscure places such as the Larabanga Mosque in Ghana and the National Art School in Cuba. The goal is to rescue these buildings and over the past 10 years the WMF has granted more than $47m to 214 sites. As a result of the attention, an additional $124m has also been raised from other sources-mainly foundations, private donors and corporations. Here, we take a look at some of the lesser-known former settlements and homes included on this year's list

 

click here for the URL

 

33. Ottawa Sun: The little building that could: 145-year-old Kars hall will roll into Upper Canada Village next week for a fresh start
TOM VAN DUSEN

KARS - After 145 years, the boarded-up little frame building on this rural Ottawa village's main street is looking much the worse for wear. Close to the curb, it stands out like a sore thumb. It's weather-beaten; the metal roof is rusty; parts have gone missing. Passersby would be forgiven for seeing it as an eyesore of no use to anyone. But that couldn't be further from the truth. The building has a long and venerable history as one of Eastern Ontario's first Orange halls, so much so that it's about to be flat-bedded to Upper Canada Village near Morrisburg where it will be protected for future generations...

click here for the URL

 

34. Victoria Times Colonist: City weighs in on reno at Rogers' - Plan to expand chocolate shop's interior sets off alarm bells with heritage buffs
Carolyn Heiman

Victoria city staff continue to work with Rogers' Chocolates officials to find a solution that will save the store's historic interior and satisfy the owner who wants to expand the retail space. Discussions were spurred after a building permit had been issued to renovate the interior of the store designated both by the city and the federal government as having heritage significance. Rogers' announced at the end of last year it would temporarily close the store at 913 Government St. to renovate the interior. The news alarmed heritage advocates because the 1903 Queen Anne style interior had remained relatively untouched since it was built.

 

click here for the URL




35. Daily Commercial News and Construction Record: Royal Architectural Institute of Canada responds to plan for roof over Vancouver
VINCE VERSACE

Plans to erect a wooden roof over Vancouver's Robson Square require more public information about the project, says the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC). British Columbia's Premier Gordon Campbell and his government plan to build the giant wooden roof over the landmark square in time for the 2010 Winter Olympics. The square was designed by famed architect Arthur Erickson and is the site of the Provincial Law Courts, UBC Robson Square, government office buildings, and public space connecting to the Vancouver Art Gallery

 

click here for the URL

 

36. Ministry of Culture Package "Supporting Heritage in your Community"

The Ministry of Culture has created new materials as a tool for groups and individuals to support heritage in their community. They have prepared a slide show and support materials.

click here for the URL

 

37. Moose Jaw Times Herald: Historical importance of Anavets building investigated
RON WALTER

The stately downtown area home built by Moose Jaw’s first banker may be saved from the wrecker’s ball. The Arthur Hitchcock home, currently occupied by the Anavets organization, has been sold to Temple Gardens Mineral Spa for a parking lot. Heritage advocate Doug Smith learned the home of the city’s first banker was scheduled for demolition this spring and approached the spa. "They’re willing to look at us moving it," he said. Smith igot people at the Sukanen Ship Pioneer Village and Museum to look at the possibility of moving the structure to the museum south of Moose Jaw.

click here for the URL

 

38. Halifax Chronicle-Herald: Heritage, height and heating
LARRY HUGHES

DURING the final few months of 2007, public meetings were held in and around Halifax to discuss "HRM by Design," Halifax Regional Municipality"s proposed plan for the Regional Centre on the Halifax peninsula. The plan, based in part upon the belief that Halifax is about to become a major financial centre, calls for the construction of more highrise office and residential towers, radically altering the downtown core. Opponents of the plan argue that the heights of the proposed buildings are not appropriate and will continue to erode Halifax's remaining built heritage. Not surprisingly, the plan's proponents claim that it will make Halifax a great city, recognizing both heritage and the need for building height.

 

click here for the URL




39. Daily Commercial News: Montreal's Windsor Station for sale?

Fate of Montreal landmark sparks local controversy

 

As Canadian Pacific Railway moves closer to selling historic Windsor Station in Montreal, a local heritage protection group is worried about what will happen after the sale goes through. A Canadian Pacific spokesman confirmed the railway is involved in negotiations, though no agreement has been signed.

 

click here for the URL

 

40. Google: Obituary of Howard Colvin
Richard Hewlings, forwarded by Stephen Otto

Sir Howard Colvin: Architectural historian whose

Howard Colvin was the greatest architectural historian of his own time, and perhaps ever. He admired his seniors Sir Nikolaus Pevsner and Sir John Summerson, but both of them were indebted to him for the factual basis on which their judgements were formed; revising Summerson's 1945 Georgian London in 2001, Colvin wrote "[its] combination of brilliant thought and writing with factual carelessness is quite difficult to handle".

The intellectual model whom he regarded as almost faultless was Robert Willis, whose Architectural History of the University of Cambridge (1886) pioneered the solution of archaeological problems by absolute mastery of the documentation, yet Colvin's six-volume History of the King's Works (1963-1982) alone was a greater achievement than Willis's. In addition, Colvin produced what might have remained the authoritative Biographical Dictionary of English Architects 1660-1840 in 1954, had he not expanded it to include Scotland and the years 1600-1660 in 1978 (with the title A Biographical Dictionary of British Architect 1600-1840), and brought out a revised edition in 1995.

It is possible for the very well-informed and very diligent to find an error, or even two, in 1,264 double-column pages of 10-point text, but difficult - and unusual. At the time of his death, Howard Colvin had nearly completed proof-reading the fourth version of this astonishing work, whose versions since 1954 have been the starting point of all historical research on the architecture of early modern Britain.

click here for the URL

 

41. News from Saint John: An excellent Blog with all the latest

click here for the URL

   
SUPPORT : Issue No 110 January 22, 2008
 


42. Subscription is free, but financial contributions to support the work are most gratefully received by the volunteer editor. At the moment I am hoping to be able to establish the bulletin on-line, with photos, and advocacy tools, and perhaps raise enough to hire some assistance. Receipts will be sent, but Built Heritage News does not have charitable status.

Cheques are payable to:
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CONTACT : Issue No 110 January 22, 2008
 


43. cnasmith@builtheritagenews.ca